What is net neutrality and why it is important

Internet is built around the idea of openness. It allows people to connect and exchange information freely, if the information or service is not illegal. Much of this is because of the idea of net neutrality. If you like the current state of the internet, you should know about net neutrality. Many web users are aware of it.

Net neutrality is an idea derived from how telephone lines have worked since the beginning of the 20th century. Some countries have rules that enforce net neutrality but most don’t. Instead, the principle is followed because that is how it has always been. It is more of a norm than a law.

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Via – Economic Times

 

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What is net neutrality?

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has set new rules to regulate Internet providers. ISPs would be barred from blocking or slowing access to any website or content on the web, for instance to benefit their own services over those of competitors.

CLICK HERE for details about the concept of net neutrality and the FCC’s work to regulate Internet traffic

Via – The Hindu

Ultra-superfast 5G broadband comes closer

Researchers are investigating how software-defined cellular networking might be used to give smartphone users the next generation of super-superfast broadband – 5G.

Currently, the fourth generation of mobile phone connection technology, 4G, in as far as it has been adopted provides broadband-type connectivity through two standards: the Mobile WiMAX standard and the first-release Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard.

The hope is to be able to achieve download speeds of perhaps 10 Gbits/s, researchers said.

The research is being undertaken by Ming Lei of Samsung Research and Development Institute China, Lei Jiang of NEC Laboratories, Beijing with colleagues at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China in Chengdu, Beijing Jiaotong University and the University of Kurdistan.

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via The Economic Times.

India set to become second-largest internet market

According to a report by the Internet and Mobile Association of India (IAMAI) and IMRB International, the number of people online in India is forecast to touch 302 million or 30.2 crore by end of 2014, overtaking the US as the second-largest Internet market in the world.

The Internet user base in the country is further estimated to grow to 35.4 crore by June 2015.

China has the largest user base with more than 60 crore Internet users, while the US has an estimated 27. 9 crore users.

Of the 27.8 crore users, 17.7 crore are in urban India, higher by 29 per cent from 2013. This is expected to reach 19.0 crore by December 2014 and 21.6 crore by June 2015.

In rural India, the number of Internet users is expected to reach 11.2 crore by December 2014 and 13.8 crore by June 2015.

Microsoft wants to use white space broadband to connect rural India to the internet

Rural regions in India could soon have improved high-speed internet delivered over the last mile without wires, if a Microsoft program that taps unused wireless spectrum to provide free internet to rural regions receives government clearance.

Microsoft has sought clearance for a pilot program in two districts for its white space initiative. White space technology has previously been deployed in South Africa, Ghana, and the UK, although to this point white space broadband hasn’t been deployed at a commercially meaningful scale.

Microsoft’s tech uses the unused buffer frequencies — “white spaces” — between TV channels to carry data. In India, these spaces end up being available in the 200-300 MHz spectrum band, although there are chunks of unused spectrum available in India up to 700 MHz. Currently, that spectrum belongs to a national broadcaster in India, Doordarshan.

White space signals can travel up to 10 kilometers, which makes the technology perfect for connecting rural or expensive-to-wire areas. For participating regions, a $20,000 white space router in a town center would receive the white space signals and then provide free Wi-Fi access to the town’s citizens.

Microsoft is looking to prove that its technology is commercially viable, which would eventually require various regulatory agencies to approve the spectrum use. But the upside is considerable — some have estimated that white space connectivity (at speeds up to 4Mbps) could cost as little as ₹130 per month per user.